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CityPoint Church finds new ways to worship amid the coronavirus

The church held a concert at the local park and asked families to participate from their cars to stay safe

Union photo by Ashley Duong

Tara Luers, a Washington resident and CityPoint Church member, said she was excited to be able to participate in the church’s concert Wednesday evening.
Union photo by Ashley Duong Tara Luers, a Washington resident and CityPoint Church member, said she was excited to be able to participate in the church’s concert Wednesday evening.
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WASHINGTON — Though the coronavirus is keeping churches from physically gathering, CityPoint Church in Washington found a new way to worship together.

The congregation participated in a socially distant concert Wednesday evening at Washington’s Central Park. CityPoint Worship performed as community members stayed in their cars, parked around the square.

Cari Widdel, an organizer of the concert, said the church worked with public health officials and the city’s mayor to make sure the gathering was safe for everyone. Widdel noted that because the church is currently unable to meet on Sundays for their usual services due to gathering restrictions in response to the coronavirus outbreak, they wanted to find a way to let people know they aren’t alone.

“We just know that in our current season, some people are crippled by fear and anxiety with so many unknowns. A way to silence that is to come together and pray, know that god still is good and we’re in this together. It will be a physical and tangible reminder, to trust Him despite the unknown,” she said.

Families from Washington filled the square as the CityPoint Worship group began performing. Emmett Allen, who brought his three children to the concert, said it has been difficult explaining to his children why they suddenly stopped attending church two weekends ago.

“It’s been a real downer for the kids. They’re constantly asking us why we aren’t going,” Allen said.

The father added being able to gather in the midst of a pandemic is “a symbol of hope” for the community.

“It shows that it doesn’t matter what the world is facing — God is the answer,” Allen added.

Tera Pickens, who also watched the concert from her van with her husband and children, said she felt the concert would give people a “source of hope in the uncertainty.”

“It allows us not to lose faith in this time of darkness,” Pickens said.

Tara Luers, another CityPoint Church member, said it’s “awesome” the church can still get together.

“It’s important that we pray together and come together, so we know we’re not alone,” she said.